COVID-19 Misinformation on Social Media: A Study of the Understanding, Attitudes and Behaviors of Social Media Users

Lowai G. Abed
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Abstract


The dissemination of information via social media is important, particularly during a public health emergency. However, while it is undoubtedly useful in the targeting of genuine health communications, social media may also be used to spread health-related misinformation at times of disease outbreak or pandemic. The study presented here researches the spread of COVID-19 misinformation in Saudi Arabia, by exploring the relevant understanding, attitudes, and behaviors of Saudi Arabian citizens. The current study comprises a survey of 318 adults in Saudi Arabia, of all age groups and educational backgrounds, and from all Saudi Arabian provinces. This study highlights the significance of COVID-19 misinformation and concludes that, despite risks to public health and wellbeing, Saudi Arabian citizens do not consider COVID-19 misinformation to be a significant problem. Participants in this study were relatively aware of such misinformation and its dangers, but it did not greatly concern them, and generally they declined to tackle it proactively. 


Keywords


Misinformation, Social media, COVID-19, Pandemic

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References


Abed, L. G. (2021). COVID-19 misinformation on social media: A study of the understanding, attitudes and behaviors of social media users. International Journal on Social and Education Sciences (IJonSES), 3(4), 768-788. https://doi.org/10.46328/ijonses.273




DOI: https://doi.org/10.46328/ijonses.273

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International Journal on Social and Education Sciences (IJonSES) - ISSN: 2688-7061


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International Society for Technology, Education and Science (ISTES)

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.