Developing Pre-service Elementary Science Teachers’ Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs through Microteaching by Promoting Efficacy Sources

Tezcan Kartal, Irem Dilek
96 70

Abstract


Science teaching efficacy belief (STEB) is of paramount importance as it motivates teachers to teach science or hinders them from teaching science. Pre-service teachers' efficacy beliefs may change during their method courses. Knowing how pre-service teachers' beliefs change over time can significantly contribute to teacher educators to improve teacher efficacy. This study examined the effect of microteaching on pre-service elementary science teachers' STEB. Pretest-posttest control group design was utilized. Data was collected using the Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (STEBI-B) developed by Enochs and Riggs (1990) both at the beginning and end of the study. The treatment group planned and taught mini-lessons. The lessons were videotaped and evaluated in detail by watching the videotapes. The microteachers replanned and retaught the mini-lessons based on the feedback. The microteaching practices were conducted to support efficacy sources. The control group only planned and taught mini-lessons and received brief and undetailed feedback. Results showed significant differences in participants' personal science teaching efficacy beliefs and student outcome expectancy beliefs in terms of the treatment group. The STEB scores of the control group also decreased at the end of the study. It is suggested that pre-service teachers should have the opportunity to reflect on their performances, artifacts, or lesson plans and to design them several times.

Keywords


Pre-service elementary science teachers, Science teaching efficacy beliefs, Microteaching, Sources of the efficacy

Full Text:

PDF

References


Kartal, T. & Dilek, I. (2021). Developing pre-service elementary science teachers’ science teaching efficacy beliefs through microteaching by promoting efficacy sources. International Journal on Social and Education Sciences (IJonSES), 3(4), 710-731. https://doi.org/10.46328/ijonses.124




DOI: https://doi.org/10.46328/ijonses.124

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2021 International Journal on Social and Education Sciences

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Abstracting/Indexing


 

 


     


  

International Journal on Social and Education Sciences (IJonSES) - ISSN: 2688-7061


affiliated with

International Society for Technology, Education and Science (ISTES)

www.istes.org


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.